Three regional carriers form CaribSky alliance

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bimjim
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Three regional carriers form CaribSky alliance

Unread post by bimjim » Tue May 08, 2018

http://www.travelweekly.com/Caribbean-T ... y-alliance

Three regional carriers form CaribSky alliance
Gay Nagle Myers
May 07, 2018

Three Caribbean airlines formed an alliance to make air travel easier and cheaper within the region.

Antigua-based Liat, Air Antilles of Guadeloupe and St. Maarten's Winair formed the CaribSKY alliance to allow passengers to travel on any of the three airlines on one ticket through the English-, French-, Spanish- and Dutch-speaking islands.

The travel will be facilitated through codeshares and interline agreements, according to Air Antilles CEO Serge Tsygainitzky.

"Sometimes a customer has to buy two or three tickets to get to a single point. This alliance will enable seamless travel on one ticket," he said.

The three carriers have a combined fleet of 25 aircraft.

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Re: Three regional carriers form CaribSky alliance

Unread post by islandflyer » Sun May 13, 2018

Hmm...

(taken from http://www.caribbeanaviation.com/alliances.htm) - I added the bold type for emphasis

Following discussions from October 2000 between LIAT, WINAIR and Air Caraïbes (BWIA was invited to join the discussions but declined), the CaribSky alliance was launched on 08JAN01 by the three airlines plus Tyden Air and Caraïbes Air Transport. Essentially, this alliance is about how the airlines can collaborate on the 32 airports they serve in order to cut costs and increase revenue. A key component of the agreement is that the partners should focus on their routes from their home bases and feed traffic to alliance members. So, the following bases were established:
Barbados (BGI) - LIAT has since made BGI its biggest hub for connecting traffic; BGI is the biggest international gateway in the Eastern Caribbean
Antigua (BGI) - base of LIAT, international gateway
St Lucia (SLU) - LIAT has a major operation
Guadeloupe (PTP) - base of Air Caraïbes, gateway to French Caribbean
St Maarten (SXM) - base of WINAIR, big international gateway to Dutch and French Caribbean
San Juan (SJU) - biggest Caribbean gateway, feeder for LIAT and Air Caraïbes
Santo Domingo (SDQ) - strange base as only Air Caraïbes serves this airport (with a daily flight from Point-a-Pitre)
One consequence of the alliance has been the axeing by LIAT of its flights to Fort-de-France and Point-a-Pitre and replacing them with flights operated by Air Caraïbes. Another was the termination of its services into St Vincent and Union Island out of Martinique by Air Caraïbes. This was a blow to St Vincent which had expected the merger of airlines into Air Caraïbes to increase traffic to its country, and followed a drastic drop in traffic following the axeing of American Eagle flights in January 2001.
The alliance is hampered, however, by having three incompatible reservations systems.

BWIA/LIAT
On 16NOV00, BWIA and LIAT signed a memorandum of understanding to enter into a comprehensive strategic alliance to increase the opportunities for the airlines to offer joint competitive and cost-effective air transportation services. Both carriers said that there were tangible and significant benefits to be derived from harmonising their flight schedules and services, eliminating inefficiencies, optimising the use of resources and combining the strengths of each. It was also noted that the airlines were aiming to improve the quality of the interline air transportation they now offered. And through a series of initiatives, they plan to provide the Caribbean with new and enhanced service options and further alternatives designed to facilitate the easy flow of passengers and cargo in the region and internationally, thereby increasing overall revenues and reducing costs.
This alliance, however, has not resulted in the demise of BWIA's BWee Express which competes with LIAT, nor was it a help in LIAT's establishment of its single reservations centre in Port of Spain (BWIA was not chosen to provide the service).
On 08JAN02, the two airlines announced their alliance, claiming to have overcome their mutual distrust and different cultures which had prevented close co-operation for decades. The major purpose of the alliance is cost reduction, made more urgent since the events of 11SEP01, through joint purchasing and sharing of many services in other areas, as well as increased revenue through marketing both airlines as one in all their destinations. It is intended that passengers will benefit through integrated schedules and better baggage handling. The agreement takes effect on 01MAR02, following the code-sharing agreement to be signed later this month.
Neither airline has invested in the other.
This new alliance is due to start on 15JUL02, having implemented a merger of commercial departments, codesharing, through fares and rearranged schedules. Still to come are merged procurement and airport management."



I seem to recall a CaribSky logo - a stylized blue oval with orange text - on the side of the Carib Express BAe 146's back in the mid '90's when they were codesharing with BW, but I may be mistaken.

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Re: Three regional carriers form CaribSky alliance

Unread post by bimjim » Sun May 13, 2018

My own observations of BWIA (and it may have survived into CAL) over the last 50 years is that the airline used to happily sign Agreements - ANY Agreements - with other carriers and then ignore them.

Much like Trinidad's behaviour in CARICOM and the ACS. Trinidad does what is good for Trinidad, and to hell with EVERYBODY else.

On at least two occasions when I was working at LIAT there were discussions, followed by signed Agreements, for LIAT and BWIA to coordinate schedules so that there would be convenient connections for the passengers and avoid all the millions of hours spent waiting, to the point of overnights, to catch the connecting flight.

On both occasions management hailed it as a bright new day of cooperation, but the actual result was that LIAT changed its schedules to accommodate BWIA, and BWIA sailed merrily along on the same schedules they had been running before, no changes. So much that several times I heard LIAT people in Barbados asking BWIA to delay departure by 20 minutes for LIAT connecting passengers to make the flight, and BWIA pushed back on time regardless.

The benefit to those Agreements? A big fat zero. The negative to those Agreements? Thousands of passengers screwed over, despite booking a guaranteed through-connection, and LIAT in chaos - again - through the ever-present politically appointed mismanagement, crossed signals and screwups trying to adapt their schedule to changes that did not really fit the airline's usual patterns.

It is entirely possible that BWIA management only signed those Agreements so they would have something like a Keystone Cops routine through the islands to belly-laugh at for the next several months.

So what do we expect of CaribSky? I no longer expect a single good thing of LIAT, and for all the usual reasons. But I expect WinAir and Air Antilles will do well - because they have competent AIRLINE management and KNOW what they are doing - and that LIAT will (as usual) stumble around in its own special polititcally appointee-management-hotel bookkeeper darkness hoping for some kind of voodoo luck to find a path out of its own self-made maze which has no exit.

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