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Fly Montserrat skids off runway at Osborne airport; no serious injuries

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Fly Montserrat skids off runway at Osborne airport; no serious injuries

Unread post by bimjim » Tue Sep 24, 2019

https://www.montserratspotlight.com/fly ... -reported/

Fly Montserrat airplane skids off runway at John A. Osborne airport; no serious injuries reported
EDWIN L. MARTIN -
September 23, 2019

A Fly Montserrat airplane skidded off the runway Monday afternoon at John A. Osborne Airport with six passengers and one pilot onboard. The passengers did not sustain any serious injuries and were examined by medical personnel at the scene and sent home.

At about 4:20 p.m. Eastern Time, the plane, which embarked from Antigua, had just landed and was in the process of slowing down to begin taxiing to the terminal. It was raining at the time, and the plane skidded off the northeastern end of the runway and rested on an embankment near the edge of the airstrip.

Later in the day, after investigators had completed their work, the aircraft was pulled up from the embankment by crane and towed to the tarmac. A source close to the investigation said it didn’t appear that the plane sustained any serious damage. Removing the plane and any residue was a priority in order to assure that the airport re-opens in a timely manner, and also to alleviate the distraction.

It was not the first time that a Fly Montserrat airplane had gone off the runway under similar circumstances. On Saturday, April 16, 2011, a Fly Montserrat plane’s right brake malfunctioned after landing. In order to avoid departing the end of the runway, the pilot applied the left brake and ended up in the grassy area parallel to the runway. No one was injured but the plane sustained damage to the nose and wing.

On Sunday, October 7, 2012, a Fly Montserrat flight from Antigua to Montserrat crashed shortly after takeoff from V.C. Bird International. Three of the four passengers were killed, including the pilot. An investigation revealed that the crash was likely caused by water in the fuel line.

Monday’s incident will surely provide ammunition to critics who have maintained for years that John A. Osborne Airport is unsafe and the airport project was ill-conceived. With an election upcoming, the topic will also surely be campaign fodder.

John A. Osborne Airport opened July 11, 2005 as Gerald’s Airport and was renamed in 2008 in honor of the former Chief Minister. The airport is at an elevation of 550 feet and the airstrip is 600 meters (1,969 feet), one of the shortest in the world for commercial airports. Both ends of the runway feature ravines, leaving pilots very little margin for error.

William H. Bramble Airport, located in Trants in eastern Montserrat, was destroyed in 1997 by pyroclastic flows from the Soufriere Hills volcano. From 1997 to 2005, Montserrat was only accessible by boat or helicopter.

Fly Montserrat planes are Britten-Norman BN-2 Islanders with two turbo-prop engines. They can seat up to 10 passengers, including the pilot, but the cabin is sometimes altered to fit fewer passengers and more cargo.

Fly Montserrat is owned and managed by captain Nigel Harris, a British expatriate who has owned a home in Montserrat since 1989 and previously managed Montserrat Airways Limited at Bramble airport from 1990-96.

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Re: Fly Montserrat skids off runway at Osborne airport; no serious injuries

Unread post by bimjim » Thu May 21, 2020

https://www.flightglobal.com/safety/hig ... 79.article

[Montserrat] High-speed Islander spun and skidded backwards off wet runway
David Kaminski-Morrow
21 May 2020

UK investigators have determined that a high-speed landing on a wet runway resulted in a Montserrat Airways Britten-Norman Islander overrunning, spinning through 180°, and sliding backwards down a steep incline.

The aircraft (VP-MNI) came to rest when its tail snagged in the security fence at Montserrat airport.

It had been arriving from Antigua on 23 September last year and made a normal approach to runway 10 in light tailwind, according to the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch.

The inquiry states that a shower had preceded the aircraft’s approach.

70229_islanderoverruncctv_310799.jpg
Islander overrun CCTV
Source: AAIB

Montserrat tower CCTV indicated the Islander touched down at 79kt

Initially the sole pilot had been cleared to runway 10, in line with the south-easterly wind, but when the winds shifted to south-westerly the pilot was offered runway 28.

The pilot chose, however, to stay with runway 10 – which had available landing distance of 540m – and embarked on a normal 6° glidepath with full flap and an approach speed of 65kt by 1,000ft.

This approach speed would normally be reduced to 58kt at the threshold.

But the Islander was travelling much faster when it landed. Although the aircraft was not fitted with GPS equipment and no groundspeed information was available, investigators estimated the touchdown speed at 79kt based on closed-circuit television images from the control tower.

“The pilot applied the toe-brakes with the pressures appearing normal, and then released them momentarily, as they had little effect, before applying them again,” the inquiry says.

“The aircraft was not slowing down and, as it passed the taxiway intersection, the brakes were applied much harder, again with little effect.”

As the end of the runway approached, the pilot applied full right aileron and right rudder, intending to turn onto the adjacent grass area and avoid an overrun. But the aircraft skidded and spun through 180° before travelling backwards off the edge of the airfield.

70230_islanderoverrun_151600.jpg
Islander overrun
Source: AAIB

None of the occupants was injured but the aircraft suffered damage

None of the seven occupants was injured but the aircraft was substantially damaged, with a fractured horizontal stabiliser and bent elevator, dented wing-tip fairing, and displaced anti-collision light.

“It appears that either increased airspeed over the normal approach speed of 65kt was used, or a significant change in wind speed and direction led to an increased tailwind component,” says the inquiry, adding that this “greatly increased” the required landing distance beyond that available.

Safety findings include a recommendation to install a means of arresting overrunning aircraft.
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Re: Fly Montserrat skids off runway at Osborne airport; no serious injuries

Unread post by bimjim » Sat May 23, 2020

https://discovermni.com/2020/05/21/assi ... -accident/

ASSI Report Confirms Speed and Wet Runway Contributes to Fly Montserrat September 2019 Accident
MAY 21, 2020
islanderoverrun.jpg
Images of the crash from Social Media

The UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) has released the report into the incident involving a Britten Norman Islander aircraft (Registration VP-MNI) operated by Fly Montserrat, which took place at John A Osborne Airport, Montserrat, on 23 September 2019.

According to the report, “No aircraft defects were found that would have contributed to the outcome. The touchdown groundspeed was 79 kt, which was higher than appropriate, either because the approach was flown at an airspeed greater than the normal 65 kt, or because of a significant change in windspeed and direction during the approach. This, combined with a wet runway and skidding, resulted in the aircraft requiring more distance to stop than was available on the runway.”

Since the incident and up until February 2020, flights were restricted at the airport unless the runway surface was dry. The decision to resume flights was given to each airline based on their ability to comply with new stipulations. Read more at —-https://discovermni.com/2020/02/28/to-f ... -when-wet/

The report contains a comprehensive investigation into the circumstances surrounding the incident and makes three safety recommendations. These are: revising procedures for pilots and operators to take account of local wind variations; improving access for emergency vehicles; and, the installation of an aircraft arresting system. These recommendations will be considered by the designated aviation regulator, Air Safety Support International (ASSI) and the John A Osborne Airport management team.

In a statement released to local media, the agency said “Prior to the AAIB identifying the wet runway surface as a contributory factor in this event, as a safety measure, ASSI had prohibited operations when the runway was reported as wet. In line with international safety requirements, the overall condition of the runway surface has been subject to close monitoring over the years by the airport team and, as expected, had degraded over a period of time. Because of this, again in line with international safety requirements, plans to resurface the runway had been agreed and were in place prior to the incident. Once this project has been completed, the safety mitigations in place for wet conditions will be reviewed.
islanderoverrun2.jpg
Images of the crash from Social Media

“The airport is compliant with safety requirements although the topography surrounding the runway presents challenges both in terms of access for emergency vehicles and for the feasibility of installing an aircraft arresting system. Currently, it is not clear if there are any commercially-available aircraft arresting systems which would be suitable for installation at the airport and, therefore, further research will be required on this aspect.
“John A Osborne Airport is an important asset to Montserrat and it is subject to a stringent safety and security oversight programme which complies with the requirements set out by the International Civil Aviation Organisation. “The AAIB report recognises that this programme is comprehensive, inclusive and compliant with international safety standards. All parties remain actively engaged and committed to ensuring that the airport continues to be a safe facility to support the people of Montserrat,” the release stated.

Download report:
Britten-Norman Islander, VP-MNI 06-20
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.u ... _06-20.pdf
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