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Guyana’s international civil aviation compliance increases further

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Guyana’s international civil aviation compliance increases further

Unread post by bimjim » Mon Jan 27, 2020

http://demerarawaves.com/2020/01/27/guy ... s-further/

Guyana’s international civil aviation compliance increases further
Denis Chabrol
January 27, 2020

Guyana’s latest civil aviation rating has moved up to nearly 77 percent, Director-General of the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA), Retired Lieutenant Colonel, Egbert Field said Sunday in New York.

He told an election campaign fundraising meeting that from 2007 Guyana’s compliance with International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) rules and regulations was 44 percent, but by 2016, due to “political will” by the coalition-led administration, that figure moved to 64.6 percent and after an audit last week the figure now stands at 76.9 percent.

“If that isn’t progress, what else is?” said Field. “This is the political will of the government to see things move in the right direction.” he added.

Before returning to head the GCAA, Field – a former GDF and commercial air pilot with the now defunct Guyana Airways Corporation – was also Director, Flight Safety Department of the Jamaica Civil Aviation Authority (JCAA) before returning to his homeland. While in Jamaica, he was Transnational Inspector for the Caribbean Aviation Safety and Security Oversight System (CASSOS)

Aviation Minister, David Patterson said with such a level of increasing compliance, government planned to eventually seal a public-private partnership for a national airline between 2020 and 2025. “In the next five years, we will, of course, sit down now with a partner; hopefully a nice Guyanese private sector partner and discuss the reintroduction of an international airline,” said Patterson.

Before a Guyana-registered airline could fly to the US, the Cheddi Jagan International Airport would have to be recategorized 1 by the US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA).

He also stated that in another five years Lethem would have a new regional airport.

Patterson noted that Guyana has not been bringing in fly-by-night airlines that essentially begin operations during the peak season and then flop during the low season, leaving hundreds of passengers stranded on both sides of the Atlantic.

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Re: Guyana’s international civil aviation compliance increases further

Unread post by bimjim » Wed Jan 29, 2020

http://demerarawaves.com/2020/01/28/guy ... ion-audit/

Guyana airport ready for US aviation recategorisation audit
Denis Chabrol
January 28, 2020

The Civil Aviation Authority is now better prepared to apply to the United States (US) to grant a category 1 rating to the Cheddi Jagan International Airport, should a Guyana-registered and based airline apply to fly to the United States.

Director-General of the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) Egbert Field says that with Guyana’s compliance with International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) rules and regulations now at 76.9 percent, the country is better prepared for a US audit leading towards a category 1 status.

He says the US Federal Aviation Authority is ready to conduct an audit for category 1. “They responded and did say they are willing to assist us to move into or to attain category one status. To do that, they are willing to send a team as soon as we give them the ‘ok’ to assess our situation, to assess where we are so that if there are any gaps, we can fill them but we are at a level now that we can move towards talking to the FAA about category 1,” said Field.

The GCAA Director-General says it makes no sense applying for Category 1 and there is no airline that is registered in Guyana to fly to and from the US. “We will do that as soon as an airline gives us the indication that they want to base themselves here. Moving to acquire category 1 is a commendable effort but if you don’t have an airline, in the space of 60 to 90 days you lose category 1 if you don’t use it so you just have an airline based in your country to utilise that category 1 rating,” Field said.

Aviation Minister David Patterson said government and a willing Guyanese private sector partner would within the next five years to reestablish a national airline. The state-owned Guyana Airways Corporation had in 1997 been declared bankrupt and closed.

Field said there have been several formal and informal expressions of interest to re-establish a national airline. “We have been asked and interest has been shown in certain areas,” he added.

The GCAA Director-General said recruitment of experts, modernisation of legislation, and amendments to manuals and procedures, all accounted for the ICAO increasing Guyana’s level of compliance.

The GCAA says Guyana made significant progress in its compliance with the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs), moving from 65.22% in 2016 to 76.96% in 2020, an increase of 11.77%. Equally important, in the area of aviation safety, Guyana does not have any Significant Safety Concern. With this result, Guyana now cements its position as No. 4 in the CARICOM Region for effective implementation of ICAO SARPs, and well above the global standard of 65%.

Field said this level of compliance puts Guyana below Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, and Belize, but above Barbados, St, Kitts, Grenada, The Bahamas, St. Lucia, Suriname, Haiti, Barbados and Antigua.

“It’s well above the world average of 65 percent…We are in the league with the big guys now,” he added. He noted that 10 years ago, Guyana was 44 percent compliant, just above Haiti and second to last in the Caribbean.

During a post audit brief, the ICAO Audit Team said the GCAA is on the right path and only need to continue; the Civil Aviation Act 2018 is one of the best Act seen in the North and Central American Region and can be used as a model by other States; the staff of the GCAA are passionate about their work and this can only help in the growth of the Authority; and Guyana has one of the best Air Navigation Services (ANS) Inspectorate in the world and the best in the Caribbean Region.

“The accomplishments and progress came as a result of the dedicated work by staff working beyond normal working hours and on weekends with the National State Safety Programme Coordinator, Col (Ret’d) Cargile Kyte, who is also the GCAA’s Safety Management System Coordinator. For improvement in its compliance level in 2016, Guyana was awarded the Council President Certificate by ICAO in 2017,” GCAA said.

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Re: Guyana’s international civil aviation compliance increases further

Unread post by bimjim » Wed Jan 29, 2020

https://guyanachronicle.com/2020/01/29/ ... tus-rating

GCAA engages FAA on Category One status rating
…ICAO audit finds no significant aviation safety concerns here
…TSA audit finds no shortcomings at CJIA/EFCIAA airports
January 29, 2020

With positive ratings from recent assessments by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) and the US Transportation Security Authority (TSA) under its belt, the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) has commenced discussions with the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) on attaining the coveted Category One rating after a 17-year hiatus.

Last week, following a safety oversight audit, the ICAO awarded the GCAA an impressive 76.9 per cent, a figure which Director General of the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA), Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Egbert Field, noted at a press briefing on Tuesday, is well above the global average of 65 per cent.

He was speaking during a press briefing at the GCAA headquarters on High Street in Kingston. “We are in the region of category one,” he said, regarding the FAA rating system which is similar in various ways to the ICAO rating system.

He said that the GCAA has commenced discussion with the FAA on the subject and he noted that the body has indicated that it is willing to assist the local umbrella body in the process. “We are at the level that we can talk,” said Field, an experienced aviation management professional.

He cautioned, however, that the Category One rating would require the establishment of an airline, which wishes to establish itself with its headquarters here. He explained that after attaining the rating, it must be maintained and he noted that the FAA can revoke the rating within a 60 to 90-day period after issuance.
Director General of the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA), Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Egbert Field (fourth left), addresses members of the media. He is flanked by other executives of the GCAA (Delano Williams photos)

“You must have an airline in your country to use category one,” he said. This led to the subject of a national carrier, but Field told reporters that the GCAA is a regulatory body and as such, it is up to the public or business sector to establish such a venture.
He said there are intentions from individuals to start a national carrier and interest has been shown from certain areas, both formally and informally.

As regards the coveted FAA Category One rating, Field said that the FAA examines the procedures and systems of the country requesting the rating. He said the body specifically audits the operations which deals with personnel licensing, operations of the civil aviation authority and airworthiness procedures in the country being audited.

Field also explained that the rating comes after an audit and he noted that any country under the ICAO banner can audit another’s systems. However, he added that the United States has more wherewithal as regards its capability to audit other nations.

Regarding the recent ICAO audit which was conducted between January 14 and 21, 2020, Field said that following the assessment of the GCAA systems, the ICAO team found that Guyana does not have any significant safety concerns.

He said the rating, which climbed 11 per cent from 65 per cent which was recorded in 2016, is an indication that Guyana is improving its safety standards and according to him, this gives airlines comfort to come into a “safe zone”. He elaborated that that it is an indication that the aviation industry is on the rise.

“With this result, Guyana now cements its position as number four in the CARICOM Region for effective implementation of ICAO SARPs, and well above the global standard of 65 per cent,” he said.

“The team worked hard,” Field said, as he commended his team of professionals, noting that it is the responsibility of the GCAA to move the industry forward and ultimately take aviation here to new heights.

He said the audit, termed the Coordinated Validation Mission (ICVM), was requested by Guyana and it focused on the application of various annexes of the ICAO as well as the application of that body’s standards and operating practices. “GCAA is on a right path and needs to continue,” he said.

On Tuesday, Field also spoke about another audit with the US Transportation Security Authority which was undertaken two weeks ago at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA) and the Eugene F Corriea International Airport at Ogle.

“There were no findings with reference to security oversight at the two airports,” Field told reporters. He said it is the second time TSA came to Guyana to assess the country’s two international airports.

An upbeat Field said the year has started in a “fantastic manner” for the aviation sector here.

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